Society s view on interracial dating

About 14.6 percent of newly married couples reported in 2008 that they married outside their race or ethnicity, according to the Pew report released Friday.

In 1980, about 6.8 percent of newlywed couples surveyed said their spouse was of another race or ethnicity.

Interracial relationships have taken place in America since colonial times, but couples in such romances continue to face problems and challenges. When slavery of blacks became institutionalized in the U.

S., however, anti-miscegenation laws surfaced in various states that barred such unions, thereby stigmatizing them.

(CNN) -- "Interracial/interethnic marriage is a great way of fighting war, hatred and prejudice. That comment was one of the thousands of responses to the story about a new study from the Pew Research Center that found interracial and interethnic marriages are at a record high of about one in seven.

" wrote a reader about a story on race and marriage.

Overall, reader reactions voiced support for mixed relationships, with many commenters proudly identifying themselves as being in an interracial or interethnic relationship.

Young people are even more open-minded: Roughly 9 in 10 millennials said they'd be OK with a family member marrying someone of another race or ethnicity.Statistics show that over 70% of American society has no problem with mixed race relationships, and 40% of Americans have already dated someone of another ethnicity.For the most part relationships between people of different races are no different from the interactions between people of the same race (Duru, 2012)....Reflecting on her personal experience, Danchar821 wrote. I went to Mexico every month last year and we were married. There are cultural differences, but if anything, they have helped me to grow as a person.She is wonderful and so loving and I feel truly blessed and happy.

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