Dating an ibanez acoustic guitar speed dating in germany

and Fuji Gen Gakki guitar factories to manufacture Ibanez guitars, and after the Teisco guitar factory (Teisco String Instrument, Company) once closed down in 1969/1970, Hoshino Gakki used the Fuji Gen Gakki guitar factory to make most Ibanez guitars.

In the 1960s Japanese guitar makers started to mainly copy American guitar designs and Ibanez branded copies of Gibson, Fender and Rickenbacker models started to appear.

The Ibanez trademark originated from the Fuji plant in Matsumoto, Japan. factory began producing instruments under the Ibanez trademark.

Other distribution offices include Quebec (for Canada), Sydney (for Australia), and Auckland (for New Zealand).

Later, he was contacted by Hoshino to form a closer business relationship.

The first entry level solid body guitars featuring original designs first surfaced in the mid-1960s, some bearing the Elger trademark, and some bearing the Ibanez logo.

The reason I get asked it is because many people who are selling an old guitar without the Ibanez brand on it put something to this effect in their ad: So, if you have found this article because you are considering buying a cool old guitar, the information I have presented below should help you avoid paying more for a guitar than it is actually worth, or finding out later, when you go to sell it, that it really isn't an Ibanez at all.

Hoshino Gakki (the Japanese trading company that owns the "Ibanez" brand name) took great pains to address the issue way back then, but these days, nobody seems to take their word for it.Ibanez was certainly guilty of copying Gibson, Fender, and Martin models, among others, but they were also one of the most proactive companies when it came to introducing original designs.I have been playing, collecting, repairing and analyzing vintage Ibanez (and other MIJ guitars) for over 30 years, and I am often asked this question.In the early 1970s, American guitar manufacturers (particularly Gibson, Fender, and Martin) were experiencing a steady decline in production quality while more Japanese- built guitars were showing up in the American market.By the mid-‘70s, these Japanese guitars consisted of mostly blatant copies of popular American designs and the quality was much better than people wanted to admit.

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